Crime

Manchester accountant jailed for £1.4m fraud

The convicted Stephen Day used the money to purchase several properties in Scotland, took a holiday in Dubai and was also in the middle of refurbishing an 45 acre estate in Scotland which had its own salmon fishing area on the River Annan

A chartered accountant and former NHS executive from Manchester who siphoned almost £1.4m from several companies, including those that care for vulnerable adults, has been jailed for 11 years and five months following an extensive six-year investigation. 

Stephen Day of Quiech Mill, Blairgowrie, Scotland, but formerly of Aberford, Leeds, was handed the sentence at Leeds Crown Court on 15 April after pleading guilty to 12 counts of fraud offences and theft. Day is also subject to a director’s disqualification for nine years.

Day, who was a financial turnaround consultant and accountant, would advise businesses on finances, and worked under more than 20 company names, including Entrusted Group Ltd of The Flint Glass Works, Jersey Street, Manchester.

According to police reports, Day would take over financial control of firms bank accounts, and large sums of money would go missing. 

However, the money was instead being paid into Day’s own company accounts instead of suppliers, and Day used “false narratives” to explain how they got there, including “using fake financial accounts to provide to directors at annual general meetings”. 

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Whilst carrying out these enquiries officers learned that the NHS Counter Fraud Authority had uncovered that Day had also become a financial director for numerous trusts at the same time, and failed to disclose it to his employers. 

Day used the money to purchase several properties in Scotland, took a holiday in Dubai and was also in the middle of refurbishing an 45 acre estate in Scotland which had its own salmon fishing area on the River Annan. 

It’s believed he has fully refurbished another property in South Africa too, in order to let out as a holiday rental.

Detective Sergeant Stuart Donohue at the Manchester Police, described the case as the most “painstaking investigation” of his career to date.

He said: “Around 160 evidence boxes, recovered from his estate and office, which are full to the brim with folders have been scrupulously examined by the team. And this doesn’t include all the interview transcripts, digital files and endless hours spent tracing his movements.

“Day was a career-criminal. He built his life on cheating and stealing. He was very meticulous in what he did and would often move money to and from so many accounts that it was difficult to distinguish the route it had taken. He did this to try and trip us up and confuse us, but we never doubted that we would uncover the extent of his deceit and greed.”

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