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Women more concerned than men about future job prospects, says PwC

The study also revealed that workers from ethnic minority backgrounds are more likely than those who are white to feel their ‘current jobs could be made obsolete within the next five years due to advancing technology’

Women are more likely than men to be concerned about their future job prospects, a PwC survey of 2,000 UK workers and 32,500 workers globally has found.

PwC’s ‘Upskilling Hopes and Fears’ 2021 study finds that fewer than 29% of female workers feel “positively” about how the future world of work is likely to affect them compared to nearly half 45% of men. 

The report showed that 41% of women also say they feel nervous about what the future holds for them compared to 29% of men. 

In addition, 37% of women responding to the latest survey felt that technological advancements will “improve their future job prospects” compared to 44% of men. 

The study also revealed that workers from ethnic minority backgrounds are more likely than those who are white to feel their “current jobs could be made obsolete within the next five years due to advancing technology”. 

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What’s more, 43% of workers from ethnic minority backgrounds say they lack access to technology which in turn limits their opportunity to learn new skills – higher than the 33% of white employees who responded in the same way. 

Katy Bennett, people and organisation director at PwC, said: “Given the disproportionate impact of the pandemic on women’s jobs, it’s no surprise that they feel less positive about the future of work. 

“However, it is important that organisations think carefully about how the introduction of new technology and ways of working will impact their female employees. If women are less positive, they may be less immediately active in engaging with new technology and reskilling programmes, with a resulting knock-on impact on their experiences at work.”

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