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IFAC names new president

The International Federation of Accountants (IFAC) has announced the election of Alan Johnson as its new president. He will serve a two-year term until November 2022.

Johnson served as IFAC deputy president since November 2018, and first began his service with IFAC a decade ago when he joined the Professional Accountants in Business Committee. 

He was elected to the IFAC Board in 2015, and since 2018 has chaired the IFAC Planning and Finance Committee, helping to “steer the development” of IFAC’s new strategic plan.

Johnson previously worked for Unilever for 35 years in various finance positions in Africa, Europe and Latin America, including chief financial officer of the company’s Global Foods businesses. 

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He has recently ended his term as chair of ACCA’s Accountants for Business Global Forum, and as non-executive director of the UK’s Department for International Development where he chaired its Audit and Risk Assurance Committee.

Johnson said: “IFAC, working in the public interest, plays a critical role to support sustainable economic development and the development of international standards.

“Every year, IFAC provides expert guidance and advice to our member organizations and the millions of professional accountants they represent worldwide. I look forward to working with the IFAC Board, management, and membership organizations to continue delivering this support during a time of unprecedented challenges.”

In addition to Johnson’s appointment, IFAC has also confirmed the appointment of Asmaa Resmouki as deputy president. 

Resmouki has served on the IFAC Board since 2018 and as Governance Committee chair since 2019. She brings with her over 28 years of experience in the industry, and was previously an audit partner at both Deloitte and EY in Morocco.

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